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Rebuilding Kanger OCC v2

Discussion in '"How To" - Rebuilding Tutorials' started by EarnestAccord, Oct 7, 2015.

  1. EarnestAccord

    EarnestAccord Bronze Contributor Member For 2 Years

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    I cant claim this all as mine, but I have not seen a step by step of how to rebuild the new Kanger OCCs from start to finish. As many know, the v2 has a different assembly and thus there we're some speed bumps in getting the thing cracked open with-out destroying its housing. I found a lone video showing the hack and then combined that with exsisting tutorials of how to then build a vertical coil and that, IMHO, is where the magic happens. This is my third build on this individual OCC and have succesfully opened her up without damaging my coil. For your virgin OCC just pull out the bottom pin, insulator and rip the old coil out from the bottom as demonstrated in so many of the other guides. To start with get a small crescent wrench, a #5 allan wrench and a hammer.
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    If you dont have a multi allan tool like this, you'll have to figure some way to insert the #5 allan inside the OCCs top and rest it there while you position your crescent. Takes a bit of eye balling but tighten the crescent just enough so it rests on the outer housing and not on the inner coil housing. Positioning your crescent on the diagnal of the outer housing will give you more lip surface to leverage. Then simply start tapping your crescent wrench with your hammer. The initial strike to break free the inner coil housing is the hardest of all the strikes required as the inner coil housing will start to slide out and loose tension.
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    That's it. Now proceede as you like. What follows is how I've choosen to do this. I've built myself a .7ohm 5 wrapped 5/32 spaced coil w/ both legs turned down at a 90deg angle.
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    I use the sandwich style organic cotton cut to match my coils height, and split it on one end.
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    This part I am unsure on whether it is necessary or not, but I sandwich my top lead, the one that passes over the entire coil, between the two layers of cotton.
    image.jpeg
    I then wrap the cotton around,as tightly as possible, around the coil, either once or twice(easiest to hardest to re-insert). Paying attention not to restrict the inner air flow route. Then using the tool used to build your coil with and keeping a firm grip on your wick, push it in to the inner coil housing with out bunching or slipping the wick off the bottom half of your coil. This step will take some practice. I started doing this with only one wrap of wick as it was substantially easier and still held everything in place. This time I used two wraps and while difficult it wasnt impossible. Attempting to lengthen the life of my wick as the single wrap only lasted about a week last time.
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    Once you've gotten the coil nice and straight in the housing slip your insulator over one of your leads.....
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    And position the other lead with metal pin.
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    Be wary of any exsessive wire hanging over the edge as it can make it difficult to insert into the tanks base. Then before you tap the outer housing back on, check to make sure you dont have any shorts and are in the ohm range you had planned on.
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    If all looks good. Reverse your proccess this time fitting the crescent wrench onto the inner coil housing and tap her back in, paying attention to your juice hole alignment.
    image.jpeg
    And you're done.
    Oops.. Wont allow anymore pics. Well regardless, some observations:
    Myself using 24g wire is purely attempting to keep my ohms as low as possible but maintaining surface area. This gauge of wire definaly doesnt fit the notches built into the housing so that everthing at the connection end is flush and tight. I just ensure the each lead is opposite to each other, keeping the pin somewhat level and I've had no problems.
    I was able to reuse my coil even though I still had to insert the alan wrench into the built assembly to pop it open. Not sure if the #5 alan slipped inside of my 5/32 coil or it just breifly enough compressed it and it sprung right back, but regardless this was ideal as now all I do is pull off the old wicking, hook it up to my RDA, burn it clean and rewick. Hope this helps.
     
    GregC, gadgetkeith, VchrisV and 2 others like this.
  2. Bowman187

    Bowman187 New Member

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    Thank you for this, i never knew you could remove the housing like that. Ive seen how to rebuild these with the coil horizontal but not vertical.
     
    gadgetkeith likes this.
  3. VchrisV

    VchrisV New Member

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    Spot on thank you.
     
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  4. gadgetkeith

    gadgetkeith Member For 2 Years

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    hi there the easiest way to remove the outer shell i found is

    screw it on to the kanger base pretty snug then just twist and pull with pliers and the outer comes off

    then you can unscrew the inner from base and take apart ie pull pin and insulator gromet

    and then remove the coil and wicking pretty much still intact

    when done a few times the outer is easier to remove the next time you need to rebuild

    you can also do the rebuild and check your resistance on your ohm meter and check for short before replacing the outer shell

    i find these newer vertical coils easier to rebuild then the older style where you had to get the top cap off and back on again

    another tip is you can drill the wicking holes out larger and should you ever have to much juice flow you can twist the outer shell to slightly off set the holes and shut the juice flow down

    hope this helps Kanger OCC V1+V2 coil heads.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2015
    VchrisV likes this.
  5. VchrisV

    VchrisV New Member

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    Cheers all info is good.
     
    gadgetkeith likes this.
  6. GregC

    GregC New Member

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    Good procedure! I've been rebuilding a few weeks and some things don't really add up with these coils.. lol
    I've been using 26g NC 80 wire, and the calculations show I can use 8/9 wraps to get .5 - .6 ohms.
    I've rebuild a few and the resistance comes out to .7 or so, but the problem is the coils fire slower than factory coils.

    The first factory one I rebuilt used 28g wire according to my micrometer, so being the smaller diameter I think makes it fire faster. On the other hand, the 26g wire has less resistance and with using 5/6 wraps you would think it would fire pretty fast but it doesn't seem to.
     
  7. dwcraig1

    dwcraig1 Member For 3 Years

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    A great help for me, thanks
     
  8. Salsworn

    Salsworn New Member

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    Made an account just to say thanks! Every tutorial ive found has been the v1.
     

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