1. LIVE: DISCUSSWELLNESS.COM LAPTOP GIVEAWAY: *NOW OPEN*

    VAPING UNDERGROUNDS FORUM SOFTWARE IS BEING UPGRADED.

batteries went for a swim

Discussion in 'Battery Junkies / Chargers' started by vasoline_slurpee, Jun 11, 2017.

  1. vasoline_slurpee

    vasoline_slurpee Member For 2 Years Member For 1 Year

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2017
    Messages:
    24
    In a very unfortunate turn of events my vape did what I can only describe as a swan dive into a dog bowl filled with fucking water. It was completely submerged for 2 or 3 seconds..completely disassembled her, dried with paper towel, and let sit out over night. I'm abaout to put it back together but I didn't even think about the batteries...
    So is it safe that the batteries were underwater for a hot sec? no visible on them.
     
  2. Mike H.

    Mike H. Gold Contributor Member For 4 Years Member For 3 Years Member For 2 Years

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2014
    Messages:
    3,372
    I would take caution but as long as they are completely dry in all the cracks and crevices they might still be ok....water is conductive so the problem is, if a drop of water connects somehow between positive and negative somewhere on the battery (most likely positive end of battery) then thats a problem.

    Maybe take a blow dryer to them on low and make sure there is no water present especially on the positive end of the battery..dont get the batteries hot just slightly warm them and let them cool..as it cools it will help evaporate any water..maybe do this a few times or put them in some dry white rice for a few days..Hopefully you have some spare batteries in the mean time.
     
  3. scalewiz

    scalewiz VU Donator Bronze Contributor Member For 4 Years

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2015
    Messages:
    486
    In reality, there should be zero chance that any water actually gets into the battery. Better not be open vents in them things.

    Wouldn't put them back in while dripping of course. Don't freak out though. Just let them dry out/off for a couple hours. Don't use high heat on a blow dryer. This will simply overheat the battery.
     
  4. vasoline_slurpee

    vasoline_slurpee Member For 2 Years Member For 1 Year

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2017
    Messages:
    24
    i mean, they're IMREN anyway so i might as well grab some new ones
     
    gakudzu likes this.
  5. Mike H.

    Mike H. Gold Contributor Member For 4 Years Member For 3 Years Member For 2 Years

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2014
    Messages:
    3,372
    Awesome idea...Something from Sony, LG or Samsung would be an awesome choice.
    Water can get under the ground insulator on the positive side and if its wet enough to seep out can short as water is conductive...A little bit of warmth to help dry any water out is not bad for the battery...internally it gets hotter when being charged...im not meaning get them hot and toasty..just a little warmth to help dry out any water ...maybe on low heat for a few seconds and let it cool and keep.doing that till you feel its dried out..so, yes it is fine to do that.
     
  6. Huckleberried

    Huckleberried Terrible wingman. Staff Member Senior Moderator VU Donator Diamond Contributor Member For 5 Years

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2014
    Messages:
    29,428
    Granted, my experience was with a flashlight & 18650, but that sucker went through a wash cycle. Wasn't my decision to try it out, but I can tell you it never gave a single issue.
     
  7. Mike H.

    Mike H. Gold Contributor Member For 4 Years Member For 3 Years Member For 2 Years

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2014
    Messages:
    3,372
    Nothing better than clean power.:)
     
    Huckleberried and skt239 like this.
  8. scalewiz

    scalewiz VU Donator Bronze Contributor Member For 4 Years

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2015
    Messages:
    486
    Water is non-conductive, unless impurities are present. Salt comes to mind; changes its conductivity quite a bit. But in the overall scheme of things, it would be a small amount. If impurities caused conductivity then the battery may slowly discharge. Any appreciable amount of current flow would generate heat, which would cause the water to vaporize, and then current flow would basically cease.

    If one is concerned that current flow has occurred, simply measure the battery voltage. If the battery didn't discharge below a safe level, then plop that thing in the charger and have a good time.
     
    conanthewarrior likes this.

Share This Page

Close This Message